Commission releases wellbeing report, Te Rau Tira

The Commission has released Te Rau Tira Wellbeing Outcomes Report 2021 [PDF, 9 MB]. Te Rau Tira introduces our vision to improve wellbeing for communities in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Our report measures wellbeing through our He Ara Oranga Wellbeing Outcomes Framework(external link), which was developed alongside communities and created with people with lived experience of poor wellbeing. It reflects what people say matters to them.

Our report found that:

  • most communities in Aotearoa New Zealand tend to experience good wellbeing, most of the time
  • a concerningly large minority of people and communities experience persistently poor wellbeing
  • most marginalised groups looked at, such as young people, veterans, rainbow communities, Māori, Pacific peoples, former refugees and migrants, children in state care, older people, rural communities, disabled people, prisoners, and children experiencing adverse childhood events, felt life is less worthwhile, and reported less security, poorer mental and overall health, and greater discrimination and barriers to wellbeing
  • there is a positive story of the growth of Māori collective strength, and oranga / wellbeing
  • at the same time, there continues to be a disproportionate number of Māori individuals and whānau who are not doing well and are experiencing poor wellbeing across multiple dimensions.

We will use our He Ara Oranga wellbeing outcomes framework to continue to monitor, report on, and advocate for improved wellbeing for the whole community, particularly for people with highest need and those who are disproportionately experiencing inequity.

You can read the news story that accompanies our report on our website news page.

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank and acknowledge everyone who has contributed to this work, without which this report would not have been possible.

We are grateful to all those who participated in the definition phase of the He Ara Oranga Wellbeing Outcomes Framework that guides this report, including the Initial Commission, the Expert Advisory Group, and the many organisations that provided input and feedback.

Access and Choice Programme progress report released

The Commission’s independent report on the Access and Choice Programme(external link) highlights the importance of improving access and choice for mental health and addiction services in New Zealand. Access to these services when they are needed, and giving people a diverse choice of services, are vitally important for the successful long-term transformation of mental health, addiction, and wellbeing systems in Aotearoa.

The Access and Choice programme has a particular focus on people with mild-to-moderate mental health and addiction needs. It aims to improve access to primary mental health, wellbeing, and addiction services, including in Kaupapa Māori, Pacific, youth, general practice, and community settings.

The report has found that the programme has put much-needed investment into primary and community care in line with many of the recommendations in He Ara Oranga: Report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction(external link), enabling important services to be provided.

The overall programme is on schedule, with the rollout of integrated primary mental health and addiction services proceeding as planned. However, the Commission would like to see the rollout of services for Māori, Pacific peoples, and youth accelerated. It also wants Youth services prioritised and delivered in ways and settings that are acceptable and accessible to young people.

Our key findings show that as of 30 June 2021, there are:

  • Integrated Primary Mental Health and Addiction services available in 237 general practices, across 16 district health boards (DHBs)
  • 12 Kaupapa Māori services across 11 DHBs
  • Nine Pacific services across seven DHBs
  • 18 Youth services across 15 DHBs, including the expansion of Youthline nationally.

For the news story that accompanies this report, click here.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank our external peer reviewers for their guidance and advice, and the time they gave to strengthen our report.

We gratefully acknowledge the efforts of our peer reviewers:

  • Dr Julie Wharewera-Mika
  • Dr Sarah Appleton-Dyer

We are also extremely thankful to the people with lived experience of mental distress or addiction (or both), and service providers who have shared their perspectives and experiences of the Access and Choice programme. 

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